Eating Healthy

Eating a healthy and balanced diet is essential to good health. The best way to do so is making positive changes in your diet. Nutritionists strongly advise people to eat fresh produce as much and as often as they can. The different color of fruit and vegetable signifies the variety of nutrients present in each of those. When you eat a variety of natural produce throughout the year you are getting the right kind of nutrition. The following are healthy eating tips from nutritionists in Brisbane and Gold Coast.

  • Try to eat as many green leafy vegetables as you can. As children you must have often heard eat your greens. This is especially important in your adult life as well. All green leafy vegetables are rich in antioxidants. These are great illness fighting agent. Not only do they help keep you in shape because these are low calories but can be good for your digestive system as well.
  • Stock up on lentils. The benefits of eating a diet rich in lentil cannot be undermined. These grains contain nutrients which can help improve the immune system and help you feel fuller for longer. If you want to lose a few pounds without compromising on delicious food, make sure you have your daily dose of lentil soup. It’s wholesome, rich and nutritious. Plus the slow burn provided by the soup is good for the metabolism as well.
  • Fruits are delicious. You can have your fill of fruit without adding too many calories in the diet. Plus fruits are also rich in fibre. Mangoes are seasonal fruits but are so rich in iron and this makes these a must have. A mango smoothie can help keep the huger at bay and also keep you feeling cool and refreshed for a long time. Including a fruit smoothie as a morning breakfast option is an easy way to get a vitamin packed meal in one go. Just toss in fruits of your choice in the blender and add some low fat milk and you can have a delicious milk shake ready in no time. Fruit shakes and smoothies are easy to make and can help you feel energetic throughout the day.
  • Become a protein fan. Eggs are delicious and yummy plus they have loads of good stuff which can help add protein in your diet. Protein should be an essential part of your diet. These are building blocks which are responsible for most of the bodily functions. Those who are vegetarians can get their fill of proteins from a variety of plants.
  • Good carbs are those which burn slowly. Oats, quinoa and brown rice are examples of good carbs. They are a healthier option then most white carbohydrates in the market. These provide the necessary nutrition minus the calories.
  • Calcium is necessary for bone health. The body is not able to make calcium on it own and it should be taken in the form of food or tablets also make sure you get your daily dose of vitamin D in the form of sunlight.

Keeping all these tips in mind would allow you to live a healthy and balanced life. For more nutritional advice, contact nutritionists Gold Coast.

Training “Educational and Educational Gardens: How to Link Education and Urban Agriculture”

Many studies show the effect of urban agriculture initiatives, whether in school or early childhood education or other settings. Indeed, it promotes awareness of biodiversity; contributes to the improvement of fitness and a healthy diet; allows you to reconnect with nature and develop a strong sense of belonging to your environment.

This training proposes to give the necessary tools for the establishment, animation and management of educational and educational gardens, while exploring inspiring initiatives. It will provide participants with practical knowledge and pedagogical tools to use gardening as a lever for active pedagogy. Also, it will be a space for sharing experiences, concrete resources for starting such projects and a networking space, in order to support the global movement of educational and educational gardening.

This training is intended for teachers, teachers, presenters, working with various clienteles and wishing to set up urban agriculture projects in their institution, their center of early childhood, their community or other medium.

The training will be given by Karine Lévesque, in collaboration with Christelle fournier and with the participation of Éric Duchemin, scientific and training director of AULAB.

THE FORMATRICES

Karine Lévesque holds a Bachelor’s degree in Special Education from UQAM (2002) and a DESS in Educational Administration from UdM (2009). In December 2016, she completed the short graduate program in environmental education at UQAM. Since 2002, she teaches students with disabilities or social or academic difficulties and is constantly looking for new projects to get young people into school and then motivate them. Following his participation in the 7 thsummer school on urban agriculture, she developed a real passion for food justice and urban agriculture. In 2015, she set up the “Les jardins des Patriotes” project, which has become a large-scale project, supported by several organizations, within the Micheloise community north of Montreal.

Christelle Fournier is an assistant in agroecology and permaculture. She is currently implementing numerous collaborations in Montreal with the Gamelin Gardens, the Croisée de Longueuil’s solidarity garden and the Champs des possibles.

USEFUL INFORMATION

Two dates: March 17 or April 14
Cost of training: $ 50
To register: https://en.surveymonkey.com/r/6NJBJXC
Training plan:  http://www.au-lab.ca/ plan_formation_2018

Payment must be made by check on behalf of the Urban Agriculture Laboratory and sent to:

Laboratory on Urban Agriculture
2349 Rue de Rouen
Montreal (QC) H2K 1L8

What is organic farming? | Biology for All

It was in the Carnot project in 1848 that agriculture appeared as an integral part of the primary program:“Primary education comprises the main facts of agriculture. “

Already the 1850 law on public education places elementary agriculture among the optional subjects of education in primary schools.

It is important to familiarize the children of the rural communes early with the good agricultural practices and to make them love the work of the fields.

In a predominantly rural France, the maintenance of populations is an economic and political issue.

Fourtoul’s arguments are primarily political when he declares to the rectors in the circular of April 18, 1855: ”  I do not need to insist to you on all that is pregnant for the future the idea of teaching of the concepts of agriculture in primary schools. On the one hand, this teaching must have the effect of propagating good cultivation methods, and of putting a certain number of schools in a position to contribute themselves to the expenses of their maintenance; on the other, and, above all, the government is entitled to expect this important result, to preserve among the teachers simple and modest tastes, and to connect them by positive interests on the ground of the communes which have entrusted them with their schools.  “

Victor Duruy takes up again the idea expressed by the teachers during the inquiry of 1861, of a more practical, adapted and reserved teaching to the children of the primary school.

In his instructions of 1867, he asks the teachers of the rural communes to endeavor to give, by the choice of dictations, readings and problems, an agricultural direction to their teaching, either in the class of the day, or in that of evening, and from time to time, in their adult classes, after the ordinary lessons of writing, calculation and spelling, agricultural readings accompanied by explanations and advice.Teachers must make every effort to annex a garden to their school, in order to exercise the children in the practice of horticulture.

The county councils are authorized to modify the regulations of the primary schools, as to the fixing of the hours of work and the time of the holidays, in order to reconcile the classical exercises with the works of the fields.

A teaching of agricultural concepts in primary school seems to be the solution against the desertification of the countryside.

The teaching of elementary notions of agriculture becomes compulsory in 1882.

The Spuller circular of December 11, 1887, reaffirms the need for the existence of a garden for any new school construction.